Category: Patriot Employer

VetCV Logo

Loud and Clear Founder Pulling Together a Strong Coalition to Support Veterans & Families

TEAM VetCV Logo

This Group Understands the Value of Teams – They All have a Proven History of  Making Stuff Happen!

Thank you for including VetCV in this important Kick-off meeting. Cristina Villarreal, founder of Loud and Clear, assembled an impressive coalition of professionals and organizations who all share a common mission of supporting the needs of our nation’s Veterans and their families. We at VetCV look forward to doing our part and working with such outstanding team members!

Team Zoom image

Though this new initiative is still in the early stages of figuring out how participating organizations can all collaborate and bring resources to Veterans and families. This effort and model has the opportunity to reach communities across the country.

If your organization offers services Veterans and/or their families can use, or if you are hiring, we encourage you to email or call us at teamvetcv@vetcv.com, 850.441.2008, and we’ll get you connected to the network.

If you or someone you know need help now in finding a job, starting a business, or navigating VA services and benefits, your team at VetCV will connect you to the right people and resources if we can. Start by logging into your VetCV Vault, creating a new account, or email us at teamvetcv@vetcv.com.

VetCV Tips & News for Vetrepreneurship

Part of our mission is to support Veteran owned businesses with tools, resources, ideas, and tips they can use as they manage and build their businesses. We are starting with “News & Tips” like this blog post but will expand inside the VetCV Vault App into a dynamic resource library of tools and resources our Vetrepreneur VetCV Community can trust and count on.

The economy will roar back and VetCV will be there to help! If you have any ideas, interesting stories, or news your VetCV brothers and sisters can benefit from, let us know and we’ll get on it!

VetCV Logo

Paycheck Protection Program Version 2.0 is Now Open, Timing to Submit is Critical – Do Not Wait

Vetrepreneurship News & Tips

Veteran owned businesses, call your banker now! You don’t want the money to run out before you get yours!

The $284 billion PPP2 refundable loan offering is now available for struggling small businesses, especially Veteran owned businesses.  Just as in the first round, most PPP2 loans use the same multiplier of 2.5 times a company’s average monthly payroll for 2019. This time there is also increased access to PPP for veteran, minority, underserved, and women-owned businesses. SBA has also expanded the ways you can use the funds. To be eligible you must:

  • Have 300 or fewer employees
  • Suffered at least a 25 percent drop in quarterly revenue in ANY quarter from 2020 relative to the same quarter in 2019
  • For those who received funds from the first PPP offering, eligible second-draw borrowers must have used or will use the full amount of their first PPP loan on or before the date on which the PPP Second Draw loan is disbursed
Calculating Your Revenue Loss

Calculating your revenue loss can be tricky so make sure your CPA and/or banker agree on the numbers. This time you may now use your 2020 payroll data as well, potentially maximizing your loan amount. Calculating revenue loss; pick ANY single quarter from 2020 where your gross revenue dropped at least 25 percent OR you can choose to annualize your numbers (compare your 2020 revenue from 2019 numbers). Though we believe these are the rules today, always triple check with the SBA (link below), your CPA, and your banker.

View the latest information from the SBA here for more information or here for Veteran specific information.

Even if you didn’t apply for a PPP loan for your business the first time, you really need look into it and to act now!

Use of Funds

The use of funds has been expanded a bit this time and now includes payroll costs, mortgage interest expense, rent, utilities, covered operations expenditures, covered property damage costs, covered supplier costs, and covered worker protection expenditures.

Expect Some Confusion & Clunkiness With the Rollout

Your banker will likely be overwhelmed with requests for information and help in processing applications but don’t take the chance of you falling through the cracks – CALL THEM! Expect a bit of chaos and confusion though as everyone tries to set up processes while making required adjustments and enhancements to their systems. The good news is that some borrowers using the same banker as their first PPP lender, may even see reduced paperwork requirements. Adding to the likely frenzy will be a lot of “elbowing” by everyone to make sure they get to the front of the line, be prepared to do a little of that yourself. As Veterans, that’s not a new concept though, go get some.

If your banker isn’t as responsive as you need them to be, give them a little room for understanding, but you may also be well served to try find another one to hedge your bets while you wait! Remember, one plan is no plan, make a back-up plan. You don’t want the money to run out before you get yours! Make sure you get on their radar, confirm they are indeed participating, and get your application submitted ASAP.

VetCV Tips & News for Vetrepreneurship

Part of our mission is to support Veteran owned businesses with tools, resources, ideas, and tips they can use as they manage and build their businesses. We are starting with “News & Tips” like this blog post but will expand inside the VetCV Vault App into a dynamic resource library of tools and resources our Vetrepreneur VetCV Community can trust and count on.

The economy will roar back and VetCV will be there to help! If you have any ideas, interesting stories, or news your VetCV brothers and sisters can benefit from, let us know and we’ll get on it. Let’s get going and take on 2021!

VetCV Logo

2020 is Thankfully Behind Us, Let’s Crush 2021!

VetCV Happy New Year 2021

Good Riddance to 2020! Now Let’s Take On 2021.

Good riddance, 2020 is behind us, the election is over, and now we “Adapt and Overcome” as we make 2021 a year of new prosperity for our friends, family, and America. We could all benefit from “Calm Seas and Fair Winds” for a few minutes, then Let’s Crush 2021!

This year VetCV we will continue to add new Vault App features asked for by members. We are working on the next two Vault modules in our development que for the first half of ’21. They are My Health and My Pets.

  • My Health: This feature will begin with being able to track your meds and immunizations. Additional My Healt pieces will be rolled out as they are built and tested.
  • My Pets: We are pretty excited about the My Pets module too. Probably because we know how important they are to so many of us. You’ll be able to quickly create a profile for all your pet family members, even track important information about them. We’ll keep you posted on our progress.

Our really big push for 2021 will also be on helping the VetCV community find “Great Jobs with Great Employers.” In addition to getting more employers to join as Top Patriot Employer Partners, we will be adding more vetted teaming Partners who offer a variety of services and resources you can use as search, interview, and secure your next job. If you know someone who’s hiring we’d love the referral, please send them our way.

Get Ready Now

Because we believe COVID will be under control as we approach summer (hopefully sooner), the economy will roar back! Therefore, employers will need outstanding talent like you, and we will be signing “Happy Days Are Here Again” before summer. Now is the time to make sure you are ready by having your Resume up to date and converted to “Civilian Speak.” The VetCV Vault helps you build your resume quickly and easily with the Resume Builder feature. Of course we also have links to Teaming Partners that help Veterans on a daily basis navigate your transition. 

If you have any ideas, interesting stories, or news your VetCV brothers and sisters can benefit from, let us know and we’ll get on it. Good riddance to 2020, let’s get going and take on 2021!

Veterans Day 11/11/2019

Veterans Day 2020

Thank You For Serving

This Veterans Day TeamVetCV & all of our Patriot Partners want to thank you for your service.

Show your thanks to those who serve, our Veterans, and the families who serve with them this Veterans Day. On behalf of Team VetCV, thank you for allowing us to serve you. 

Check Out The Newest Version of VetCVV2.0

We have been working hard over the last 18 months on the New Version 2.0 of the VetCV Vault App and are happy to report it’s launch in time for Veterans Day!

With this new version, we will be able to add and enhance Vault features much faster than before. You’ll see that we have 86’d features we initially thought were really cool but found that nobody ever used them so out they went.

There are a couple of features from the previous version we will be pushing up after this release though, we ran out of runway to hit our Veterans Day deadline. So stand by for those to be going live too, we’ll keep you posted!

Please keep your ideas coming as we continue our mission to support your needs.

VetCV Badge Logo

VetCV Updates, News, & Tips

This Veterans Day TeamVetCV and all of our Patriot Partners want to thank you for your service. Many of you have joined the ranks of our Patriot Partners in the last year and many of you have helped us make sure we focus on features of your Vault you need most. We are pretty good listeners around here. In the last couple of months we have been working on the design and architecture of the NextGen of VetCV. The new version will enable us to do things much faster which means more of your suggestions can be deployed and frankly, we can drop stuff that we see people really don’t care about. We’ll be keeping you posted on our progress but our current ETA for the new version to go live will be first or second quarter of 2020.

Transitioning from the military

Our VetCV Team Members Talk About Transitioning from the Military

We sat down with our VetCV team members to ask them some questions about transitioning from the military. Find out what they went through and learn how soon you should start planning for your future.

Wesley Easton

United States Army, Sept. 2011 – Sept. 2018, E-4, Specialist

Q. When did you start planning your transition from the military? What were some of the decisions you had to make while still on active-duty that affected your future?

Being in the National Guard, we had many senior non-commissioned officers who were always telling us to think ahead and take advantage of financial help for college/technical schools. They/Florida set up job fairs for those who were interested. I decided to go to school for Software Development and that’s what I focused on when I left.

Q. What were you least prepared for when transitioning from the military?

A. The thing that gave me the most trouble was remembering that not everyone has the thick skin like most Veterans do.

Q. When choosing where to work after transitioning from the military, what did you look for and what was most important to you?

A. I was looking for jobs related to my degree, and of course I wanted somewhere that was going to be a good fit for me as well as the organization.

Q. If you went to college or took any other sort of classroom instruction courses, what did you look for in terms of education/a university after transitioning from the military?

A. I went to my hometown university, the University of West Florida, and picked the degree that interested me the most, software engineering.

Q. If you could give your former self one piece of advice about transitioning from the military, what would you tell yourself?

A. I would say to start thinking ahead as soon as you can. I would probably have pushed myself to start school sooner, so that I could have received my degree before or during my transition from the military.

Tim McWatters

United States Air Force; Aug. 15, 1996 – Feb. 1, 2017; E-7 Master Sergeant

Q. When did you start planning your transition from the military? What were some of the decisions you had to make while still on active-duty that affected your future?

A. I started planning my transition from the military about 5 years out. I had to ask myself, what do you think you want to do when you get out. I set small and large goals and then I started taking steps to accomplish those goals. I knew I wanted to get my degree in Software Engineering. College was one of the main reasons I joined the military in the first place. I made sure I took a course every semester that would work towards that degree, and I got smart on my benefits as a Veteran (GI-Bill and Vocational Rehab to name a few). I had to work hard, but I am currently in my last semester to achieving this goal, and I have also earned an amazing position as an intern in a very Veteran friendly company. I think setting goals, both large and small, are the key to a successful transition.

Q. What were you least prepared for when transitioning from the military?

A. I was probably least prepared for the amount of information given to me as my days in the military were coming to an end. There are so many amazing resources out there, but it is hard to keep track of them all (even as an organized individual). Take DETAILED notes and put important dates in a calendar, otherwise, you will become overwhelmed.

Q. What online or local communities/organizations helped you transition?

A. I found myself seeking assistance from military members that had already gone through the transition. Previous retiree’s and other Veterans are an incredible resource. No one’s transition is going to be exactly like your family’s, so ask the questions that are important to you and don’t be afraid to ask it again if the answer doesn’t satisfy you.

Q. When choosing where to work after transitioning from the military, what did you look for and what was most important to you?

A. The job search after retirement or separation is one of the most stressful times we may encounter. We know what we are worth and just need an opportunity to prove it. I think we all want to find a company that sees the benefits a Veteran brings to the table. We have been trained every day to be great decision makers, are hard workers, loyal, organized and we can make your company better if given the chance. Thankfully, there are many companies out there that are looking for employees with the skills we have learned in the military.

Q. If you went to college or took any other sort of classroom instruction courses, what did you look for in terms of education/a university after transitioning from the military?

A. I was thankful I went to a university with a great “Military Veterans Resource” office. They were extremely helpful in helping make sure I knew what resources I had available to me. The ensured I knew how to pay for classes and get the equipment I needed to succeed. I ended up at the University of West Florida studying Software Engineering.

Q. If you could give your former self one piece of advice about transitioning from the military, what would you tell yourself?

A. I would tell myself to get organized. If I think I am already organized, then get MORE organized. There are hundreds of thousands of resources available to us as Veterans, but if you don’t know how to gain access to these resources then they are useless to you. Also, get your family involved. This will be a new life for them as well.

Bryan Powell

United States Marine Corps; Feb. 7, 2010 – Nov. 29, 2014; E-5, Sergeant

Q. When did you start planning your transition from the military? What were some of the decisions you had to make while still on active-duty that affected your future?

A. I started planning approximately 14 months before my planned exit date. Prior to the end of my active service, I started the process of buying a house. I closed on the house before attending SEPS & TAPS. This had a large impact because I was committed to living in that area and committed to paying the mortgage on that property. Fortunately, I found a good realtor that helped us through the process.

Q. What were you least prepared for when transitioning from the military?

A. I was least prepared for the solitude. The military tends to have intrusive leadership, and generally speaking, military life is not private. The family you served with are no longer around you every day. The person-to-person contact is not the same after leaving. I was least prepared for the isolation that comes with leaving active duty.

Q. What online or local communities/organizations helped you transition?

A. I visited the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) several times and received some minor advice relevant to the local area.

Q. When choosing where to work after transitioning from the military, what did you look for and what was most important to you?

A. The most important thing to me was a healthy work-life balance coupled with a manageable cost-of-living. I had spent so much time away from my family and was not prepared to do that anymore. There are some occupations and some companies that require a significant amount of time away from home. That works for some, but it was something that I am not willing to sacrifice at this time.

Q. If you went to college or took any other sort of classroom instruction courses, what did you look for in terms of education/a university after transitioning from the military?

A. I wanted something that fit into a whole-package concept. My wife and I wanted to live in an affordable, low-crime area with good public education for our child. In addition, the area had to have a decent job market for an occupation I was interested in. Finally, the area needed to have a 4-year university that offered a degree in the field I wanted to work in. I am currently at the University of West Florida studying Computer Engineering.

Q. If you could give your former self one piece of advice about transitioning from the military, what would you tell yourself?

A. Develop some kind of social network at your destination. Friends, family, and just generally knowing people in the area can relieve a lot of the stress of moving to a new location without the military acting as a safety net.

Niels Andersen

United States Navy; Dec. 1, 1980 – Feb. 1, 1986; HM3

Q. When did you start planning your transition from the military? What were some of the decisions you had to make while still on active-duty that affected your future?

A. Only a couple of months out before I separated. No real plan and no guidance. I knew that I couldn’t translate my Navy Corpsman training directly into a civilian job. As a Corpsman, you would think that you would be able to go through an abbreviated Paramedic course to get certified, but no, you had to start from scratch. I had already started college and thankfully was close to finishing so that left me with options since my military training didn’t translate to the civilian workforce.

Q. What were you least prepared for when transitioning from the military?

A. How to find a job and how to interview.

Q. What online or local communities/organizations helped you transition?

A. When I got out there was no internet and no one sat me down to talk about the real value of building a network or how to go about it. Building a network is probably the most valuable thing one can do to help themselves.

Q. When choosing where to work after transitioning from the military, what did you look for and what was most important to you?

(1984 President Ronald Reagan Campaign Speech Detail, San Diego, California)

A. Honestly, I was 23 years old so any job that paid something was my focus and I would begin learning and growing from there. It was like starting over but my attitude was that all the opportunities where there for me to figure out and make happen.

Q. If you went to college or took any other sort of classroom instruction courses, what did you look for in terms of education/a university after transitioning from the military?

A. I started college while in the Navy because I realized that I needed to learn. I was actually surprised that they accepted me, but thought that if I do well enough in class, they wouldn’t kick me out. I had no idea what I wanted to do, I just knew I had to get started and get a degree and I would be able to narrow it down as I learned more.

Q. If you could give your former self one piece of advice about transitioning from the military, what would you tell yourself?

A. Ask for advice, guidance, find people you admire and respect as mentors, and begin building your network. Volunteer, join community groups, build an online network and participate in discussions. I would have started that the minute I got to my first duty station.

[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]

Navy Veteran

The Overqualified Veteran’s Dilemma

Meet Chris Holland. Chris is a U.S. Navy Veteran and a recent graduate from the University of West Florida. During his time in the Navy, Chris was trained as a Hospital Corpsman. His training included emergency medicine, nursing practices, phlebotomy, medical documentation, and much more. Chris utilized this training throughout his time in the military to help provide medical care to service members and their families.

Due to injuries sustained while in the service, Chris’ military career was cut short. It was then he realized that, though the Navy had trained him well, they did not supply the certifications to qualify his training in the civilian sector. That was not going to stop him though. He put his military education benefits to work and pursued a bachelor’s degree in Healthcare Administration which he completed this summer. He did not know that completing his degree would produce its own set of challenges.

A 3rd generation Navy veteran, with years of medical experience, a family to support, and now a college degree finds himself unable to find employment in the civilian sector. When he applied for a Physician Office Manager position, they told him he did not have enough experience with revenue cycle functions — something that a Corpsman is not exposed to in military medicine. He then applied for Front Desk positions at medical facilities. Chris thought that if he started at the bottom, he could “earn his stripes,” and have the opportunity to show them what he could do. He was told, however, that he is too educated for these positions. “Why would someone with a bachelor’s degree want to work the front desk?” they ask him. He is stuck between not having the experience that employers want for the jobs at his education level and being overqualified for the jobs at entry level.

It was then that Chris connected to fellow Navy veteran and President and CEO of VetCV, Niels Andersen, through a mutual contact. Niels educated Chris on the importance of building a strong network of contacts. Niels also pointed out to him that he and other veterans were “trained to be trainable” during their time in the service and he needs to make sure to emphasize this competitive advantage over other candidates for the job and the value this brings to an employer during an interview. Their ability to quickly and efficiently learn new tasks is often undervalued, underestimated, and underutilized by civilian employers. It’s his job to point out the fact that the DoD invests on average $422,000 over a 4-year enlistment in training and this translates directly to the bottom line of an employer by decreasing the onboarding time, ability to solve complex problems quickly, and efficiency at getting at the work at hand.

Chris Holland is one of many veterans who face challenges when re-entering the civilian workforce. Employers do not seem to understand the potential these valuable candidates have if only given the opportunity.

Chris was fortunate to have had the opportunity to have worked at the University of West Florida (UWF) Military and Veterans Resource Center while he was a student. He is extremely thankful to UWF for all they do to support and work with Veterans. UWF ranked No. 5 in the nation on the list of military friendly schools. Their Military and Veterans Resource Center is one of the reasons it makes this list and is led by Navy Veteran, Marc Churchwell. Marc does a great job with connecting community industry with Veterans when they need help.

At VetCV, we as a team are working to create a place where Veterans, their family, and friends, can seek help through all of life’s difficulties. At one point in each of our lives, we have been jobless, working on or with a degree, and willing to work in any position to provide for our families.

Chris is located in Pensacola, FL and is actively searching for a position with a company that is immediately hiring either for his skills or in a position that will give him an opportunity to show the value he can bring to an organization. Our sole mission at VetCV is to help people just like Chris and his family so call us at 850-441-2008 if you’d like to reach out to Chris or connect with him on LinkedIn.

[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]